Culture Change – Time To Throw Away The Carrot And Stick

This post explores alternatives to the behaviourist-informed practices that currently hold sway as many organisations attempt to change their cultures. After writing about Gestalt as an approach to personal development, I’ve also been reflecting on how it offers solutions to the challenges facing many of our organisations. Flowing from what seems to be an endless trail of[…]

The Paradox of Change – A Gestalt Perspective

I recently revisited the work of Paul Barber¹, a recognised authority in Gestalt facilitation. It reminded me how much my work with individuals, groups and organisations has Gestalt theory and practice as a core strand. It also reminded me just how powerful Gestalt approaches to personal and group change can be, but also how paradoxical[…]

Embodied Leadership by Pete Hamill – Book Review

This post is a review of Pete Hamill’s book, Embodied Leadership: The Somatic Approach to Developing Your Leadership. At just short of 1400 words, this post is longer than usual, but I make no excuses. Stretch your attention span a little. This is an important book covering an important approach to leadership development. I’ll start by[…]

Passwords – symbols of disempowering organisation cultures

Congratulations must go to the humble password for adding unnecessary cost into our businesses, making our systems less secure and contributing to the disengagement of millions of employees. They are indeed symbols and actual contributors to disempowerment within our organisations. A bit harsh? I don’t think so. For me, passwords have become one of the[…]

HR’s “point of inflection” – Peter Cheese shares his thinking

I recently attended an event with Peter Cheese, newly appointed CEO of the Chartered Institute of Personnel & Development (CIPD), which celebrates its centenary this year (2013). Peter was answering questions put to him by an audience composed of mainly HR professionals. He was refreshingly honest and candid with his answers. He seemed to be[…]

Disrespecting colleagues carries costs

I recently came across an article in Harvard Business Review (February 2013) on incivility in the workplace. The authors talk about the costs of incivility to the organisation: “Many managers would say that incivility is wrong, but not all recognize that it has tangible costs. Targets of incivility often punish their offenders and the organization,[…]

Why organisations do bad things

One doesn’t have to look far to see examples of unethical behaviour in our corporations and public bodies. The sale of unwanted or inappropriate products and anti-competitive collusion seems to be rife. Slavishly following process is proving to have lethal consequences in some of our hospitals. These stories add up to give the false impression[…]